Welcome!

Welcome to my Polish blog! My Polish great grandpa was orphaned during the Chicago flu epidemic of 1918 & spent his life looking for all of his siblings. Some family stayed in Chicago & some returned to Poland. Some family was Catholic, & some are believed to be Jewish. I post the things I learn in efforts it may help someone else in their research. I also hope this blog helps me connect with others that know about the people I'm learning about. Digital images of records or links are put inside most postings so you can view records full screen. I encourage comments. Feel free to sign the guestbook, stating who you're looking for. Maybe we can all help each other out this way, because there are many challenges with Polish research. I hope you enjoy learning with me. And I hope to be taught more about my Polish heritage.
I have added a few languages to this blog through Google translate. I hope that it may be accurate enough with the communication of ideas.
Thanks! -Julie

Witam! (Polish translation of Welcome)

Witam w moim polskim blogu! Mój pradziadek został osierocony w czasie epidemii grypy w 1918 roku i spędził wiele lat poszukując swojego rodzeństwa. Część rodziny pozostała w Chicago a część wróciła do Polski. Część rodziny była katolikami a część, jak przypuszczam, wyznania mojżeszowego. Piszę w moim blogu o rzeczach które odkrywam i o których dowiaduję się mając nadzieję, że pomogą one wszystkim zainteresowanym w ich własnych poszukiwaniach. Wierzę, że ten blog pomoże mi w skontaktowaniu się z ludźmi którzy wiedzą coś na temat osób ktorych poszukuję. Zdjęcia cyfrowe lub linki umieszczone są w większości moich komentarzy i artykułów, można więc otworzyć je na cały ekran. Gorąco zachęcam do komentarzy. Proszę wpisać się do księgi gości i podać kogo Państwo szukacie. Może będziemy mogli pomóc sobie nawzajem, ponieważ nie jest łatwo znaleźć dane których szukamy. Mam nadzieję, że zainteresuje Państwa odkrywanie ze mną tajemnic przeszłości. Mam rówież nadzieję poznać lepiej moje polskie dziedzictwo.

Dodałam do mojego blogu automatyczne tłumaczenia poprzez Google. Ufam, że będą wystarczające w zrozumieniu o czym jest mowa w artykułach i komentarzach.

Dziękuję! - Julie

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22 August 2009

book: The Trumpeter of Krakow, by Eric Kelly

Today I just finished reading "The Trumpeter of Krakow". I really enjoyed it. I was in my public library looking for a good book to read, and saw this book on display. I saw the Newbery Medal picture on the cover. I wondered if it was Krakow, the place in Poland, so I picked up the book to see. It was! It was written in 1929 and received the Newbery Medal that year. I remember one family letter where Jozef Sanetra mentioned there was a childrens book about Krakow written in the 1920's, so it must've been this book. I love historical fiction books. There is a forward in the copy I borrowed, explaining Eric Kelly's love of Poland, his experiences with learning and teaching about the Polish culture in the US & in Poland. It was also neat to read in the forward that the Polish government loaned the author a trumpet to show people in the US about the Krakow trumpeters. This book uses real things in Polish history. Explaining some legends, mentioning a real king, and real places in the 1400's. The trumpeters watched for fires and invaders. Even the complex relationships between the Ukraine & Poland were explained some. This book was written while Adam Sanetra was still alive in Poland. I'd like to think I read a story that he might have read too. I really enjoyed the book, and recommend it to anyone who wants to read a little about Krakow in a fun, adventurous story.

Here is a wiki link about the book, so you can see pictures of places described in the book: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Trumpeter_of_Krakow

14 August 2009

Roman & Emil Karolewski - the Godfather of Stanley Sanetra







I am looking for anyone who can tell me about Roman Karolewski. He was born 5 Aug 1871 in Sulmiorzyec, Poland, and died 26 Jun 1952, in Chicago. Or if anyone knows any Karolewski family in Chicago.

We can not find Stanley Sanetra on paper after his admission to St. Hedwig's orphanage in either Jan or Feb 1919, in Chicago. A family letter said "Stanley's Godparents ran a saloon or tavern and were good friends with Adam & Rosalie Sanetra." So I wondered if maybe Stanley's godparents got him out of the orphanage? At that time, (flu epidemic) if you needed a farm hand or helper, you could just get an orphan pretty easily from the orphanage. Paul Sanetra was taken & raised by a family this way. He was sent to a farm from St. Hedwigs. So we wondered if maybe Stanley's Godparents might have needed a hand in the saloon, and knew where Stanley was. We wondered if maybe Stanley changed his name, or if a Stanley would show up in the household. So far I haven't seen Stanley with Roman.

So I did searches to find Stanley's Godparents. I could not find the name as transcribed on the parish record (attached), "Emil Karulewski & Hedwig Monska." I looked for anyone with either of these surnames on the Census, especially on the 1910 Census, because that was the first census Stanley was alive on. I started trying fuzzy searches, and I could not find these surnames anywhere. I tried to do a Google search on just "Karulewsi", and no search results appeared at all. But the question was asked "Did you mean Karolewski?" I thought I'd try it. I found only one person with that surname, born before 1904, the year Stanley was born. And that person was Roman Karolewski. He showed up on the Chicago City directories on Footnote.com for the years: 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, and 1911, as a saloon owner at 156 W. Chicago Ave.

So I typed in the address on my Adam Sanetra addresses map. Well, this saloon is 3 blocks from Louis Sanetra, and about 2 miles exactly from where Adam Sanetra listed his address when coming back to the States in 1923. No Emil anywhere that I can find, but Roman is on city directories and the Census, right near our family. And Roman ran a saloon as my family remembered. So, I think Emil & Roman are the same person. I believe that Roman is Stanley's Godfather. Maybe Emil is the first name and Roman the middle name? I feel pretty sure Emil & Roman must be the same person but wish to have more evidence.

I have attached the following images in case it help's anyone to recognize Roman: 1910, 1920, & 1930 Census, & the passport page for Roman. It says Roman's father was Joseph. I wonder if this picture of Roman was his mother? These images were from Ancestry.com for which I have a subscription. You may click on the small picture to view them full screen. I also believe that Hedwig Monska was not married to Emil Karolewski, but instead was another friend of the Sanetra family. So far I cannot find the surname Monska in record searches. But it appears to be a part of a name and we're missing a prefix. Roman Karolewski was married to Martha Walkowiak, 24 Aug 1896 in Chicago. If you know of either of these godparents, please let me know. They are the last people that we know of who knew of Stanley Sanetra and his father Adam Sanetra.

02 August 2009

A Franciszka Sanetra married Karol Nasluchacz in Chicago, IL


I found that there are two Franciszka Sanetra's from Zywiec, Poland, close in age. One is the daughter of Anna, and the sister of Branislawa Sanetra who married Rudolph Sanetra. This Francis arrived at Ellis Island 11 Jun 1912.

The other Franciszka Sanetra states she immigrated in 1909. And she married Karol Nasluchacz in Chicago, IL 25 Jan 1910. They had 3 children:
1) Daughter: Antoinia Nasluchacz lived 5 Jun 1910 to Jul 1982
2) Son: Frederick F. Nasluchacz lived from 14 Sep 1911 to Jun 1966
3) Daughter: Aloisa Patricia Nasluchacz lived from 17 Mar 1914 to 4 Jan 2003.

Antoinia & Aloisa are listed by their maiden names on Social Security Death Index, so assuming that means they did not marry. But some Polish women kept their maiden names even in the United States.
Note the marriage record spells the name: "Naslukaz", but on my sources for this family the name is always spelled Nasluchacz. My sources for this family include: Karol's Ellis Island info; Karol, Franciszka and Aloisa's obits; the 1930 Census; Chicago birth and death record indexes, and Karol & Franciszka's marriage record. It is attached. You may click on the picture to view full screen. Downloaded from: http://pilot.familysearch.org/recordsearch/start.html#p=0
This family is all listed as buried in Christ the King Cemetery, in Wonder Lake, Illinois, United States.

Karol Nasluchacz arrived at Ellis Island 5 Aug 1907. The Ellis Island Manifest states he was from Zywiec, Galacia (Poland's name at that time). He was age 23, single, laborer, going to Chicago to see friend Karl Durej that lived on Lincoln St in Chicago. Karol was 5'5", fair skinned, blond, gray eyes, good health, port of departure Breman. He also states his father was Wojciech Nasluchacz living in Zywiec.